Glass Bead Molding Knife

Glass bead is used to hold glazing in place in windows. It's also known as glass stop, cove and bead, putty bead, glazing bead, and staff bead.

Glass Bead Molding Knife

List Price: $34.00$41.00

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    Glass bead is used to hold glazing in place in windows. It’s also known as glass stop, cove and bead, putty bead, glazing bead, and staff bead.

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  • How-To Videos

  • THE MAKING OF A WOODMASTER MOLDING KNIFE

    Dear Fellow Woodworker:

    I've been involved with making molding knives for over 15 years and I'm still blown away when I see a rough-cut board go in one end of the machine and a beautiful piece of molding come out the other end! I'm sure you feel the same way.

    At the center of this process is a Woodmaster ULTRA Molding knife. Whether you're running short runs or long runs, custom molding or standard patterns, pine or mahogany, the strength, quality and durability of Woodmaster ULTRA molding knives mean you get a better product faster.

    I think it's pretty cool the way we design them, build them and ship them and I thought you might be interested as well.

    On a custom knife, we first get a molding sample or drawing from the customer. We've done custom molding knives a small as 1/2" wide and as large as 8 inches!

    Then, a technician trained in CAD drawing scans the molding sample and converts this image to a CAD drawing.

    If we've created this drawing from a customer's drawing, we fax our drawing to the customer for approval. If we've used a molding sample, we simply compare the CAD drawing with the sample.

    Next, we email the drawing to our knife manufacturing facility.

    That's where the premium quality steel comes in.

    The knife is computer-cut from M2 or Carbide steel and then additional relief is hand-ground onto the knife behind the actual cutting edge. The edge is then hand-honed. That's why we like to say that ULTRA molding knives combine the latest computer technology with old-fashioned hand craftsmanship.

    The knife then goes back to the actual guys who drew it. They double check it against the wood sample, as well as for general quality and appearance.

    Finally each knife is packed in its own box with egg-carton foam to make sure it arrives at your door as clean and sharp as when it left here.

    I've always thought molding knife production is a really interesting part of what we do...something a lot of you, whether you're long-time owners or potential owners, might like knowing about!

    See you in the shop,

    Will Johnson, President
    Woodmaster Tools

  • Making of WM Knife

  • If clip or snipe appears at beginning of board:

    • Pressure bar may be set too low
    • Chipbreaker may be set too high
    • Upper infeed roller may be set too high
    • Lower infeed roller may be set too high
    • Spring tension may be too light on pressure bar

    If clip or snipe appears on long end of lumber:

    • Pressure bar may be set too high
    • Lower outfeed roller may be set too high
    • Upper outfeed roller may be set too low
    • Lumber may not be butted
    • Grain may be running against knives

    If knives tear out lumber:

    • Feed may be too fast
    • Joint on knives may be too heavy
    • Moisture content of lumber may be too high
    • Head may be running too slowly
    • Cut may be too heavy
    • Cutting angle may be too large
    • Grain may be running against knives

    If knives raise the grain:

    • Joint may be too heavy – light joint best
    • Feed may be too fast
    • Cutting angle may be too large
    • Head may be running too slowly
    • Moisture content of lumber may be too high
    • Cut may be too heavy

    If chip marks appear on lumber:

    • Blower system may not be strong enough
    • Feed may be too fast
    • May be loose connection in blower system – no suck power
    • Exhaust pipe may join at too large an angle to main blower pipe

    If panels are tapered across the width:

    • Center table may not be set parallel with body of cylinder
    • Grinding rail may not be set parallel with body of cylinder
    • Center table may be worn

    If undesired (pounded) glossy finish appears:

    • Knives may be dull
    • Feed may be too slow
    • Joint may be too heavy

    If washboard finish appears:

    • Knives may have been driven back into the head
    • Machine may be completely out of adjustment
    • Joint may be too heavy

    If revolution mark shows up:

    • Knives may be ground poorly
    • Knives may need jointing

    If lines appear at right angles to the knife marks:

    • Knives may have been checkered and nicked up by overgrinding and taking temper out of steel
    • Chips may have wedged between rolls and tables
    • Pressure bar may be dragging

    If stock twest in machine:

    • Pressure bar may be cocked
    • Upper outfeed roll may have uneven spring tension on it
    • Lower rolls may be cocked

    If knife lifters must be replaced frequently:

    • Jack screw may not be tight in slots and knives may drive back, shearing the lifters

    If stock sticks or hesitates in machine:

    • Pressure bar may be set too low
    • Lowers rolls may be set too low
    • Upper rolls may be set too high
    • Cut may be too heavy
    • Coaxer board may help lumber through machine

    If machine is noisy and vibrates and pounds:

    • Knives may be too dull
    • Machine may not be leveled up correctly
    • Machine may not be on solid foundation
    • Pulley belt may be jumping on pulley
    • Pressure bar may be set too low

    If morotes kick out:

    • Knives may be dull, thus overloading motor
    • Pressure bar may be set too low, putting drag on motor
    • Motor may be drawing high current because other machinery in use in the plant has pulled down the voltage
    • Machine may be out of adjustment
    • Lower toll may be set too low

    Please note: sometimes a particular machine is not suited for the job it is required to do. Also, many times a machine is worn beyond adjustment, and regardless of what is done to correct planing/molding difficulties, it cannot be made to do good work. These hints may help in some cases but not eliminate all problems in all machines.

  • Molding Shop Tips

  • CUSTOM KNIFE

    Woodmaster custom molding knives have been used across the country and around the world both to match antique patterns and to bring unique custom designs to life.

    There are two easy ways to order a custom molding knife from Woodmaster:

    1. Send a Molding Sample. If you're looking to match an existing molding, this is the best way to assure an exact match. Our technicians will take the molding you send, scan it into our computers and create a drawing from the actual scan.
    2. Send a Drawing. You can mail or email a drawing of the molding you want. Email to customs@woodmastermoldingknives.com. When working from a drawing we will send you a copy of our drawing for approval.

    In either case be sure to let us know what Brand and Type of machine you have and whether you want it made from M2 Steel or Carbide.

    Custom knives are billed at $35 per inch of steel for M2 steel and $85 for Carbide. The knife will typically be 1/2" wider than the actual molding. For instance a 2" wide molding would have a 2.5" knife. So a custom knife to cut a 2" wide molding would cost $87.50 in M2 Steel and $212.50 in Carbide.

    These prices are all inclusive and cover scanning and drawing of the knife, manufacturing of the knife, all gibs and balancing.

    Questions? Please give us a call at 1-800-821-6651

  • Custom Knives

  • We're so confident that Woodmaster ULTRA Molding Knives are the best molding knives made, we back them like no one else does:

    If for any reason you are not satisfied with your molding knives return them within 30 days and we'll refund every penny you paid, including the shipping!

  • Money-Back Guarantee